Friday, December 30, 2011

Polenta vs. Corn Mush

As near as I can tell, polenta and corn mush are the same thing--just one is pretentious because it has an Italian name.  I did a side-by-side using a tube of Trader Joes polenta and a tube of Yoders corn mush.  The only difference is the polenta didn't mash quite as much when cooked in a skillet.

Unlike a museum in Atlanta which included maize in an Etruscan exhibit on polenta several years ago, I do know that the modern version of polenta was NOT used by the Etruscans since they didn't have corn (a New World food not introduced to Italy until 1650).  The curators were kind of put off when corrected.

7 comments:

Guffaw in AZ said...

Will either work in a still? Inquiring minds want to know!

Mr.B said...

Yes, although corn flour works better.....easier to keep suspended for better fermentation.


Or so I have read.....

Old NFO said...

LOL, not EVEN going there, but 'if' I did, I'd agree with Mr.B

Midwest Chick said...

gfa--leaving that subject to those who know more of chemical reactions than I do... I have heard that in certain parts of the world, you can put out the word that you'd like a corn beverage, leave a $20 under your doormat, and come home to a mason jar of distilled goodness. Never tried it myself, but it was Junior Johnson territory so it's not outside the realm of possibility that it wasn't urban legend.

Mr.B and NFO--I got nothing but theory to go on. For me, I'm eating my corn mush, not drinking it... ;-)

og said...

The stuff I grew up with, my grandmother used to make and pack in old wood Velveeta boxes.Once it was dry she'd slice off squares and fry them in butter. I haven't yet found anything that tastes like that since.

Chas Clifton said...

Some upscale polenta served in restaurants is full of cheese. Aside from that, your comparison makes sense to me.

I assume that you reference the Etruscan Maize Incident of 2003.

Midwest Chick said...

Chas--I could definitely deal with cheesy polenta. Of course it would also need bacon to be truly excellent.

And yes, I am referencing the infamous Etruscan Maize Incident of 2003. That was a great excursion!